The best KitchenAid stand mixers

  • A KitchenAid stand mixer is a valuable kitchen tool for thoroughly and efficiently whipping, creaming, and mixing; tasks that take a lot of time and effort to do well by hand.
  • I've been reviewing kitchen equipment for seven years and worked in professional kitchens for more than a decade; our picks are based on many years of daily use with every model in this guide.
  • The KitchenAid Artisan Series 5-Quart Tilt Head Stand Mixer is our top pick for most home bakers because it has the perfect balance of power, capacity, and size, and is versatile enough to both whip delicate egg whites and knead stiff bagel dough. Plus, it comes in 47 different colors.
  • Read more: The best KitchenAid attachments
  • Sign up for Insider Reviews' weekly newsletter for more buying advice and great deals.

A stand mixer is the crowning jewel of a kitchen, and KitchenAid's stand mixers have been the standard for over a century. I've used a KitchenAid stand mixer daily — sometimes all day — while working in professional kitchens for more than a decade. It makes efficient work of tasks that typically take a lot of time or effort to do by hand, like whipping egg whites to soft or stiff peaks, effortlessly turning cream into whipped cream, churning out big batches of cookies, and kneading tough, heavy bread doughs — which is exactly how I tested four of them to determine the best KitchenAid stand mixer for different needs. 

I have years of experience with each stand mixer in this guide. I've broken them, repaired them, purchased them for my own personal use, and am intimately aware of each model's advantages and limitations. 

But I didn't just rely on my previous experiences. I put each mixer through a standard set of tests for this guide. I used a King Arthur recipe for bagels, a stiff dough with a 10-minute mixing time; I prepared Compost Cookies (kitchen-sink cookies with five cups of mix-ins including chocolate chips, potato chips, and pretzels) from New York City's Milk Bar; and put each mixer through additional tests to evaluate its capacity, mixing capability, and ease of use. You can read more about how I tested KitchenAid stand mixers in our methodology here, along with how to shop for a KitchenAid and what to make with it.

Here are the best KitchenAid stand mixers:

  • Best overall: KitchenAid Artisan Series 5-Quart Tilt Head Stand Mixer
  • Best affordable: KitchenAid Classic Plus 4.5 Quart Tilt-Head Stand Mixer
  • Best for bread: KitchenAid Pro Line Series 7-Quart Bowl Lift Stand Mixer
  • Best for small spaces: KitchenAid Artisan Mini 3.5 Quart Tilt-Head Stand Mixer

Prices and details are accurate as of 10/28/20. We've rewrote this guide by re-testing previous picks to see if they still stack up, testing new KitchenAid stand mixers, and adding how-to and FAQ sections. We're continuing to test the stand mixers in this guide for durability while looking for new models for consideration.

The best KitchenAid stand mixer overall

This popular model balances power, capacity, and size for a mixer that is perfectly designed for most home bakers; plus it comes in more than 45 fun colors.

The Artisan Series 5 Quart model strikes a great balance of power, size, and design. Its 325-watt motor is ideal for most home bakers: powerful enough to handle the occasional stiff bread dough or sticky pizza dough, but adequate for common tasks like mixing batters or creaming butter and sugar. 

During testing, it quickly became my favorite mixer to use. At 23 pounds, it was easy enough to store and move around. Tilt-head stand mixers have a smaller base than bowl-lift stand mixers so the bowls tend to be narrower and can feel cramped. You often have to stop the mixer and tilt the head back whenever you want to scrape down the mixing bowl. With a functional capacity of 3.75 quarts (read more about the difference between stated and functional capacity here), the large bowl of the Artisan 5 Quart felt open enough that I could scrape the sides without adjusting the head, had a sturdy handle for easy lifting, and provided plenty of room for pouring in ingredients — particularly helpful when adding more than five cups of mix-ins for Compost Cookies. 

While it shook a bit when I made bagel dough, it was never overly noisy and I didn't feel like I had to babysit it for fear of it walking off the counter. That said, with its lower-powered motor, I don't think I would chance to make multiple batches of bagels in a row to avoid overheating the mixer. 

For many people, the real fun in buying a stand mixer is picking out a color and the Artisan Series 5 Quart comes in 47 different color offerings, the most of any of their stand mixers. Every color of the rainbow is represented, from a cheery "Orange Sorbet" to "Boysenberry" — the deep purple color I tested and loved seeing on my counter every day. In addition to the plethora of colors to choose from, the Artisan Series 5 Quart also offers customization, allowing you to engrave your stand mixer or switch out the standard bowl for a patterned ceramic or glass mixing bowl. It also works with all KitchenAid attachments, which can extend the versatility of your stand mixer.

Pros: Easily accomplishes common cooking tasks, a moderate 23 pounds, comes in 47 different colors and finishes, can further customize with interchangeable mixing bowls, works with all KitchenAid attachments, work bowl has a handle

Cons: Too underpowered if you regularly make a lot of stiff or wet doughs

The best affordable KitchenAid stand mixer

The least expensive model made by KitchenAid, the Classic Plus has all the quality components of more expensive mixers but it's compact, efficient, and powerful enough to accomplish most tasks for casual bakers. 

The KitchenAid Classic Plus 4.5 Quart Tilt-Head Stand Mixer became my first mixer when I rescued an earlier version of this model from my dad's basement. Though it had seen regular use for most of the 15 years prior, I used it heavily for about five years before it gave out on me while kneading dough for hand-pulled noodles (a notoriously tricky dough, and one known to tax stand mixers). This issue first highlighted to me how most stand mixers break and the importance of choosing a model built to accommodate your typical usage. 

You can read more about the specifics of stand mixer wattage in our "How to choose a stand mixer" section here. But the gist is that lower wattage models have less powerful motors than higher wattage models. The stand mixers in this guide range from 250 to 970 watts and the Classic Plus is on the lower end of that spectrum with a 275-watt motor. This is perfectly adequate for common tasks like making cookies, brownies, whipped cream, cake, and the occasional bread loaf, but not hand-pulled noodles. 

I tested a new version of this mixer for this guide, and while it happily worked through cookies, egg whites, and even hefty bagel dough without issue, it's possible that with too much heavy use, like making many batches of bagel or pizza dough back-to-back, the mixer can overheat or — in the case of my old mixer — wear down its gears. While the issue is repairable, it requires seeing a KitchenAid repair specialist, which can be expensive, so you're better off purchasing a stand mixer with a wattage that meets your needs from the get-go. 

Don't let the lower price fool you into thinking it's not going to perform. If you're an occasional baker or just starting to dip your toes into cooking, this is a great model to get started with. It's made with the same metal parts as more expensive KitchenAid stand mixers, has a strong motor, and a relatively roomy work bowl. While its functional capacity is 3 quarts (smaller than its stated 4.5-quart capacity), it still easily accommodates single batches of common recipes, and it's moderately-sized at 22 pounds and 14 inches long. The machine also works with all KitchenAid attachments. My only wish is that the work bowl had a handle for better maneuverability.  

Pros: Relatively inexpensive, spacious but still maneuverable, can handle most common tasks and occasional tough doughs 

Cons: Work bowl doesn't have a handle, relatively low-powered motor, not ideal for heavy use

The best KitchenAid stand mixer for bread

The KitchenAid Pro Line Series 7-Quart Bowl Lift Stand Mixer is the largest, most powerful KitchenAid mixer you can buy without venturing into commercial models, which makes it perfect for avid bakers. 

Stiff or heavy doughs like bagel dough, pizza dough, and some noodle doughs require a large amount of power to knead properly, which can be taxing on some stand mixers. The 7-Quart Pro-Line model has a 970 watt motor for powerful and thorough kneading without overheating the mixer, as I've seen happen with smaller models. The wider bowl-lift design also provides more stability during mixing, so the mixer doesn't "walk" or shake as much during use. 

This is the model I primarily used during a decade of work in professional kitchens. The machine is reliable, nimble, easy to use, and remarkably quiet for such a large mixer. It can handle everything from whipping two egg whites to mixing triple batches of cake batter. KitchenAid claims the 7-quart size can make up to 14 dozen cookies in a single batch, and while I haven't ventured to test the limits of that claim (I love cookies, but I don't need 14 dozen), in my tests for this guide, it made a double batch of compost cookies and bagels with plenty of room to spare. 

The mixer particularly excels at making bread dough. The wide bowl, which has a functional capacity of 5.75 quarts and a large comfortable handle, is easy to remove and provides lots of space for adding ingredients during mixing and the powerful motor glides the included mixing attachments — paddle, whisk, and dough hook — effortlessly through stiff and heavy doughs. Avid bakers and especially those who make bread will appreciate its reliability — these mixers saw heavy daily use when I worked with them in professional kitchens and I rarely ever had one that needed repairs. If you take care of this mixer, it's likely to last you decades. 

That said, it's a hefty machine, weighing 27 pounds and measuring 16 inches in both height and depth. It's not the sort of mixer you want to lug around, so it's best for those with ample counter space to devote to its large footprint. It's also only available in six colors: red and five different neutrals. However, it is compatible with every attachment made by KitchenAid, including the ice cream maker bowl. 

Read our full review

Pros: Largest capacity of any residential model, bowl-lift design provides stability when mixing, wide mixing bowl for adding ingredients, powerful motor that can handle all kinds of doughs, work bowl has a handle

Cons: Heavy, takes up a lot of space, only comes in a few colors

The best KitchenAid stand mixer for small spaces

The smallest of KitchenAid stand mixers, this model is the perfect size and strength for occasional bakers, new cooks, and those with petite kitchens.

When my hand-me-down KitchenAid finally bit the dust after about 20 years of regular use, I decided to downsize to KitchenAid's latest model: the KitchenAid Artisan Mini 3.5 Quart Tilt-Head Stand Mixer. At the time, I was living in a 600 square foot apartment and every inch felt precious. Since counter space was limited, I needed a mixer light enough that I wouldn't mind hauling it out from a cabinet every time I wanted to bake. The KitchenAid Mini hit all these marks for me. 

Measuring just over 11 inches wide and weighing 17 pounds, the Mini is about 25% smaller than our best overall pick. While this may not seem like a drastic difference in size, the Mini is much more maneuverable than any other stand mixer I've used, and I love that it fits easily under my cabinets or on a shelf. Less surface area also means less to clean, and the Mini's work bowl doesn't hog space in my sink or dishwasher.

Despite being more petite, the Mini is still perfectly capable of whipping up a single batch of cookies or biscuits just as nimbly as any other stand mixer. I've made muffins, pasta dough, bread dough, pizza dough, cake, frosting, and more cookies than I can count in the Mini with no issues or changes to the mixing times called for in the recipes. That said, its functional capacity is just 2 quarts, so it's too tight a squeeze for most double batches.

When I put my Mini through strenuous tests for this guide, it showed some of its limitations. The work bowl was just able to fit all the mix-ins for compost cookies, but it started to overflow a bit when I turned on the mixer. The cookies came out perfect, but cleaning up was a bit of a hassle since I had to wipe bits of dough from the counter and the top of the mixer. Bagel dough also came together fine, but the mixer shook and "walked" around the counter during the long kneading time, enough so that I felt like I had to keep an eye on it for the whole 10 minutes it was mixing. 

That said, if space is your primary concern or you're an occasional baker, the Mini is a great option for an unobtrusive machine that can do just about anything a full-size mixer can do. It has the same 10 speeds as other mixers, comes with the standard attachments (whisk, paddle, dough hook), and works with all KitchenAid attachments except the ice cream maker. It comes in a variety of fun colors from a pink "Guava Glaze" to a bright "Hot Sauce" red, and also makes a great (albeit generous) gift for kids who are interested in baking; one that they can continue to use well past childhood.

Pros: Perfectly sized for small kitchens, easy to maneuver, makes single batches of most recipes well, ideal for occasional bakers, a good size for kids, works with most KitchenAid attachments, comes in a variety of different colors, work bowl has a handle

Cons: Too small for double batches, shakes a lot when running at high speed, doesn't work with KitchenAid ice cream maker attachment

What else we considered

We also researched other KitchenAid models for this guide that we ultimately didn't end up testing. Here are the products that didn't make the cut and why: 

  • KitchenAid Classic Series 4.5 Quart Tilt Head Stand Mixer ($259.99): Previously our best budget pick, the Classic is identical in both function and design to our new affordable pick, the Classic Plus. We confirmed this with KitchenAid, who said the only difference is that the Classic Plus is available in a silver color. There used to be a slight difference between the Classic and the Classic Plus with the former having 250 watts, a slightly less powerful motor than the Classic Plus' 275 watts. However, both models are now being made with 275 watts and are priced the same. Both are great options, and since KitchenAids have been in short supply, buy whichever you can get your hands on. We've seen some retailers still selling the 250-watt version of the Classic, so be sure to check the specs before you buy. 
  • KitchenAid NSF Certified Commercial Series 8-Qt Bowl Lift Stand Mixer ($699.99): Unless you're running a bakery, you don't need a mixer this large or this powerful. That said, if you are operating a bakery or food business, this is the only KitchenAid mixer that is certified by NSF International for commercial use. It has a two-year warranty (double the time of their other mixers) and a strong, durable motor for heavy use. However, home bakers are unlikely to need these extra features, which are designed to withstand hours of heavy use each day. 

Our testing methodology

While I drew from my own experience as a food editor working in professional kitchens and using these mixers over many years, I also put each model through a standard set of tests to see how they'd compare to each other. Here's how I evaluated KitchenAid stand mixers:

Size, capacity, and ease of use: I weighed and measured all the stand mixers, including comparing the stated versus functional capacity (the capacity when measured from the bottom of the work bowl to the top of the mixing attachment) of each work bowl. I carried the mixers around and noted how comfortable they were to move and handle.

Power: We consulted the company to learn the power of each motor in watts. Residential stand mixers range from 250 to 970 watts, and mixers with higher wattage motors can mix heavy, wet doughs more readily. 

Whipping: I whipped two egg whites to stiff peaks in each mixer, which tests the mixers' control during gradual ramping up of speed. It also tested the larger mixers' ability to function well even with a very small volume of ingredients. 

Creaming: I used each stand mixer to make Milk Bar compost cookies, which have more than 5 cups of mix-ins. Not only did this test the functional capacity of the mixers, but also their ability to operate on different speeds — high speed for creaming butter and sugar, and low speed for incorporating delicate mix-ins like chips and pretzels without breaking them. 

Kneading: Each mixer was used to make a batch of King Arthur bagels; a stiff dough with a long, 10 minute mixing time. I made a note if any of the mixers shook or walked, struggled, or made excessive noise during this tough task. 

Durability: The true test of a stand mixer is how it performs over time. While I included information from my own experience working with these models over nearly a decade, I'll continue to use the stand mixers in this guide and report back on any durability issues.

What we look forward to testing

Our picks encompass most of KitchenAid's offerings, but there are two models we're interested in testing that we weren't able to include this time around: 

  • KitchenAid Professional 5 Plus Series 5 Quart Bowl-Lift Stand Mixer ($399.99): Previously our best KitchenAid for making bread, this model was out of stock at the time of this testing. I'm of the mindset that if you're going to upgrade from our best overall pick (which is also 5 quarts), it should also offer an increase in capacity. However, this model may be a good fit for those who prepare a lot of heavy, wet doughs but either don't make large batches or are prioritizing cost. 
  • KitchenAid Pro 600 Series 6 Quart Bowl-Lift Stand Mixer ($499.99): This model offers a slight jump up in capacity from the 5-quart professional model and was also unavailable at the time of testing. It offers 15 colors; the most colors of any of KitchenAid's bowl-lift models. We'd like to test if the slight increase in capacity justifies the big jump in price.

How to choose a KitchenAid stand mixer

KitchenAid makes an overwhelming number of models. Here are some considerations to help you narrow down your selection.

Wattage: The higher the wattage of the motor, the more powerful the mixer will be. Mixers with higher wattage — like the 970 watt motor on the KitchenAid Pro — glide through tough doughs and don't easily overheat. If you bake at least once a week or you regularly make a lot of heavy, wet doughs like pizza or bread dough, then you'll benefit from a larger, more expensive model with a high wattage motor built for power and durability. However, if you're the kind of person who breaks out the stand mixer once a year to make holiday cookies, you don't need the Cadillac of KitchenAids. Occasional bakers will be perfectly well off with 250 or 275-watt models, like the Artisan Mini or the Classic Plus. Lower wattage models can also handle the occasional tough task like kneading bagel dough a few times a year. Be mindful that tough kitchen tasks can be hard on the gears of smaller machines, so give your machine time to cool down between uses if you're making a hard dough in a lower wattage model. 

Capacity: The advertised capacity of a KitchenAid mixer is not its actual capacity. The advertised or stated capacity refers to how much the work bowl can hold when completely full. Not only would you have a big mess on your hands if you tried to use a mixer at full capacity, but it also wouldn't operate effectively since the ingredients would actually cover the mixing attachment. Instead, the functional capacity is measured from the bottom of the bowl to the top of the mixing attachment and it's usually about 1 to 1.5 quarts less than the stated capacity. One quart is about the size of a large deli container, so if you have a recipe that regularly makes enough dough to fill four or five of those, opt for a mixer with a larger stated capacity of 6 or 7 quarts. It's also a good idea to buy a mixer with a larger capacity if you make a lot of bread since the mixer needs a fair amount of clearance to knead the dough effectively.  

Maneuverability and storage: The bigger the capacity and more powerful the mixer, the heavier and larger the mixer will be. The largest KitchenAid mixers in our guide can weigh almost 30 pounds. Unless you're comfortable regularly lifting an appliance of that size, you'll either need to consider a small mixer or have dedicated counter space. Larger mixers will take up about half the width of a standard size counter and may not fit readily under your cabinet overhang. If space is at a premium, consider a smaller, less expensive mixer.

Colors and customization: For some people, the most important factor in choosing a KitchenAid is the color. If a fun color is your priority, opt for a mixer from KitchenAid's Artisan series. Our best mixer for small spaces and best overall pick are both Artisan mixers and are available in up to 47 different colors. Our best overall pick also offers further customization with interchangeable decorative work bowls in various patterns and materials. The Classic and Pro Line series offer a much more limited color choice — just red and a handful of neutrals.

What to make in your KitchenAid stand mixer

We've put together a number of how-tos for making the most out of your KitchenAid stand mixer. KitchenAid makes more than two dozen different attachments that expand the versatility of your machine and let you make everything from zoodles to sausage to ice cream and more. Most of the attachments operate from the "hub" of the mixer — the portion underneath the metal disk on the top front of the machine. Since all KitchenAid mixers have this hub, almost all the attachments are compatible with every KitchenAid model in our guide. If you're interested in KitchenAid attachments, we reviewed them all here. 

Here are some of our favorite things to make with our KitchenAid mixers and attachments:

Fresh pasta: This is one of those tasks that shows the true versatility of a KitchenAid stand mixer. You use the stand mixer and work bowl to make the dough, and then the KitchenAid pasta sheeter or pasta extruder to form the pasta shapes. Read more about how to make pasta in your stand mixer. 

Bagels: Chewy bread like bagels are one of the hardest and most arduous tasks to do by hand, which means they're the perfect recipe to outsource to your stand mixer. While writing this guide, I used this recipe by King Arthur and it churned out perfectly springy bagels that reminded me of home in New Jersey.

Sausage: KitchenAid makes several attachments that allow you to grind your own meat for homemade sausage. Read more about how to grind meat and make sausage with a KitchenAid stand mixer.

Pizza dough: This type of dough is really wet and sticky, but a stand mixer excels at pulling it all together. Here's a recipe I really love for pizza dough made in a stand mixer. 

Ice cream: KitchenAid makes a special bowl that fits on all stand mixers but the Artisan Mini to make homemade ice cream. Read more about how to make ice cream in your Kitchenaid stand mixer. 

Glossary of KitchenAid terms

Tilt head: A common mixer design where the work bowl twists onto the base of the mixer. The head of the machine tilts forward for operation and lifts back so you can attach a paddle, whisk, or dough hook; add ingredients to the work bowl; or use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl. These machines have a lever that allows you to lock the head in place so it doesn't accidentally lift during mixing or moving. This style is common in smaller capacity mixers and is contrasted to a bowl-lift design.

Bowl lift: A mixer design where the work bowl sits on a Y-shaped arm extending from the body of the mixer. A lever allows you to raise and lower the bowl. A raised position brings the bowl closer to the mixer head for operation, while a lowered position allows you to more easily add ingredients or add/remove the paddle, whisk, or dough hook. This design allows for more stability during mixing but comes at the cost of a larger footprint. 

Hub: A circular port at the front of the mixer head where you place KitchenAid branded attachments such as the meat grinder, pasta cutter, or spiralizer. When not in use, the hub is usually covered by a silver medallion with the KitchenAid logo. 

Paddle: A flat, open mixing attachment included with every KitchenAid stand mixer. The paddle is used for mixing ingredients together when you don't want too much air incorporated, such as when creaming butter and sugar, mixing cookie dough, and some batters. Think of it as the stand mixer equivalent of a wooden spoon. 

Whisk: A balloon-shaped wire whisk mixing attachment included with every KitchenAid stand mixer. The whisk attachment is used when you do want to incorporate a lot of air into the ingredients you're mixing, like when whipping cream, making meringue or frosting, or mixing cake batter. It's used in similar ways to a hand whisk.

Dough hook: A corkscrew-shaped mixing attachment included with every KitchenAid stand mixer. The dough hook is used for kneading bread dough. Typically you'll mix the dough with another attachment such as the paddle, and then use the dough hook to form the dough into a ball and knead it. The corkscrew shape pushes the dough against the sides of the work bowl in an action that approximates kneading by hand. 

Attachment: Can refer to the paddle, whisk, and dough hook that come with the mixer, but also used to describe the various accessories you can purchase to extend the versatility of your stand mixer such as the ice cream maker, food processor, or meat grinder.

FAQs

What is the warranty on KitchenAid stand mixers?

Almost all of KitchenAid's stand mixers come with a limited one year warranty, though you can purchase an extended service plan for another three years of coverage. 

What do I do if my KitchenAid stand mixer breaks?

When a KitchenAid stand mixer stops working, it can usually be repaired. The machines are designed so that inexpensive gears fail before the core part of the mixer; oftentimes a repair is as simple as replacing a gear. If your stand mixer is still within warranty, you should contact KitchenAid for a replacement. However, in my experience, don't expect much from KitchenAid customer service if you're out of warranty. While plenty of KitchenAid repair videos exist online, you'll get the best results from a paid repair from the KitchenAid factory or by visiting a reputable appliance repair service. Keep in mind that you can void your remaining warranty if you attempt to repair your stand mixer on your own.

Will my KitchenAid stand mixer last a lifetime?

With proper care, it's possible! Keep in mind that technology changes, so it's never a guarantee that a small appliance like a KitchenAid stand mixer will be forever compatible with modern home wiring or safety specifications. (Your grandma's toaster or microwave may still work, but it might not necessarily be safe.) While your stand mixer might not become a family heirloom, you should get many years of use out of it. 

How do I use my KitchenAid stand mixer?

I'd start with a solid recipe for something you like to eat often, like cookies or bread. Once you know what you want to make, a well-written recipe should guide you through when to add ingredients, what speed to use, and even when to scrape down the bowl. Recipes from cookbooks or food magazines are usually well-tested and thoroughly written. Some good cookbooks to start with include "Pastry Love," "Black Girl Baking", "Bravetart," "Cook's Illustrated Baking Book", "The New Way to Cake," and "The Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook." It's also good to keep best practices in mind: avoid overloading the mixer or adding too many ingredients at once, and turn up the speed slowly to avoid kitchen messes. Only operate your stand mixer on a stable countertop or table, and don't leave it unattended while it's running. 

Can I use an electric hand mixer instead of a stand mixer?

Electric hand mixers are best used for light batters or frostings where you want to incorporate a lot of air, and it doesn't take a lot of mixing to bring the ingredients together. While the electric mixer is spinning the whisks, you're still responsible for moving the mixer around the bowl. This is much less efficient than a stand mixer where the whisk is rotating, but also moving in a circular motion around the work bowl. Electric hand mixers also aren't very good for heavy doughs or recipes with a lot of varying textures since these tend to get caught in the smaller tines of the beaters. While an electric hand mixer is an efficient way to whip up a batch of brownies or frosting, stand mixers are much more versatile.

Why buy a KitchenAid stand mixer

While there are a number of other stand mixer brands out there — including Breville, Sunbeam, Oster, and Bosch — none are as ubiquitous or revered as the KitchenAid stand mixer. Some people consider purchasing a KitchenAid stand mixer to be a life milestone, and according to The Knot, a KitchenAid stand mixer was the most-wished-for product on wedding registries in 2019. Julia Child's KitchenAid mixer even lives in the Smithsonian Museum. But what makes KitchenAid stand mixers so special?

KitchenAid stand mixers have been around for more than a century. According to KitchenAid, the brand got its name in 1919 when an executive's wife called the first home model stand mixer "the best kitchen aid I've ever had." The name stuck and KitchenAid has been synonymous with stand mixers ever since. While there are a number of great stand mixers from other brands out there, KitchenAid still stands out in a number of ways.

Durability: I've tried almost every brand of stand mixer out there in my seven years reviewing kitchen products, and KitchenAid mixers are the only ones that use an almost all-metal construction. Other brands cut costs by using plastic in part of the design: either in the body of the mixer, on knobs and dials, in the mixing attachments, or even in the gears. Mixers made with a lot of plastic are usually lighter and less expensive, but much less durable. KitchenAid mixers can last for decades because of their strong metal parts. While this stronger construction comes at a premium — KitchenAid mixers are among the most expensive out there — their durability makes them a great investment. Even the most affordable KitchenAid mixer shares this same hearty construction and powerful motor and will last for decades with proper care. There is also a robust network of authorized KitchenAid repair technicians who can repair your stand mixer if something does break.

Stability: The all-metal design makes KitchenAid mixers much heavier than most other brands. While they can be a pain to lug around, the added heft produces an important benefit: more stability when mixing. Lighter machines can shake or "walk" off countertops. The heaviness of KitchenAid mixers helps them stay put. 

A mixer for everybody: Many brands that make stand mixers only produce one or two models. KitchenAid makes almost a dozen models with different capacities, power, and price points. This allows you to choose a model that meets your needs and excels at the tasks you perform most.

Attachments: KitchenAid is the only brand that has produced a robust lineup of attachments that extend the versatility of their stand mixers. These attachments can turn your KitchenAid into a food processor, meat grinder, ice cream maker, spiralizer, pasta machine, and more — eliminating the need to buy separate appliances that are often larger and more expensive. 

Colors: It's undeniable that one of the major selling points of a KitchenAid mixer is the sheer number of colors available to choose from. KitchenAid offers its mixers in 47 different colors — no other brand even comes close to that much customization. While choosing an appliance based on color may seem silly to some consumers, the ability to pick out a color that matches your personality or decor is one of the reasons people feel such an affinity to KitchenAid mixers.

Read our guides to the best KitchenAid attachments and how to use them

The best KitchenAid attachments

How to use a KitchenAid stand mixer to grind your own meat

How to make sausage with a KitchenAid stand mixer

Check out our other kitchen appliance guides

The best espresso machines

The best blenders

The best food processors

The best juicers

Subscribe to our newsletter.

You can purchase syndication rights to this story here.

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by the Insider Reviews team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Email us at [email protected]

Source: Read Full Article