Crime surging in US with help from bail industry

Bail bonds industry accused of worsening nationwide crime

FOX Business’ Madison Alworth breaks down how bail bondsmen decreasing payment is contributing to the crime surge.

The nation’s surge in violent crime is not only the product of liberal policies but the prospect that bail bondsmen are low-balling payments.

The bail bonds industry has reportedly grown more lenient because companies are accepting low payments, allowing lawbreakers to walk free prematurely.

Progressive bail allows some people to be released without any bail. Meanwhile, criminals facing bail in violent cases are connecting with bail bondsmen who will take as little as 2% from their client in order to post their bond and be set free.

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Fox News contributor Charles Hurt and Marie Harf discuss on ‘WSJ at Large’ the massive violent-crime surge in US cities. 

FOX Business' Madison Alworth noted on "Varney & Co." Monday, since fewer people are requiring bail money as of recent, industry professionals are eager to keep up their clientele. Bondsmen in Texas have even been accused of capitalizing on violent crime and lobbying lawmakers.

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As an example, 16-year-old rapper C Blu, who was charged with shooting an NYPD officer in the Bronx, has been let out on bond with the help of bail bondsman Ira Judelson – best known for his specialty in getting celebrity clients out of jail.

Attorney and former prosecutor Vinoo Varghese said the entire system must be reformed in order to ensure public safety.

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"I don’t necessarily have a problem with him making bail," he told Alworth. "What I have a problem with is the lack of supervision while he’s out on bail. So, in the federal system, he would be basically under home arrest… you don’t have that in the state system."

According to FBI data examined by data analyst Jeff Asher, the 2021 United States murder rate is estimated to be nearly as high as it was in 25 years ago, when more than 19,600 people were killed nationwide. 

Judelson has not responded to FOX Business’ request for comment.

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Fox News' Stephanie Pagones contributed to this report.

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