Students unfazed by inflation until they learn the price of beer

College students show concern for inflation after learning about beer price surge

Campus Reform reporter Ophelie Jacobson on polling students about their perception of inflation.

The next time you’re ordering a beer, you may want to get a pitcher—it’ll last longer.

Campus Reform reporter Ophelie Jacobson joined "Varney and Co." on Thursday after speaking to dozens of students at the University of Florida in Gainesville about inflation and beer. 

She told FOX Business host Stuart Varney, at first, students showed no concern about inflation. However, they changed their tune once the price of everyday goods that college students use like gas, used cars, and beer was brought up.

A recent Wall Street Journal report found that beer prices were up 70% from last year, partly due to a supply chain shortage in aluminum for cans and "bad" trade policy.

When Jacobsen pointed to the surge in brew prices, students’ outlook on inflation instantly changed. 

"It makes having a fun night more expensive," one student told Jacobson.

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"That’s atrocious," another student echoed.

Jacobsen went on to say that putting key issues into perspective is the "best way to inform young voters." 

"Inflation isn't a problem for a college student until they go to the grocery store and try to buy a 12-pack of Corona, and it costs 70% more than it did the year before."

Last month, the Labor Department said consumer prices rose 5.4% year over year in July, matching the prior month's gain as the fastest since August 2008.

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The Federal Reserve has insisted the recent price gains are "transitory" and that those increases will mitigate once production issues are resolved.

While the timing remains uncertain, one student pointed out "life’s going to get a little more expensive" for now.

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FOX Business’ Jonathan Garber contributed to this report.

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