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Dr Manesh Saxena explains new blood pressure injection

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The Mayo Clinic says drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. It states: “Having more than three drinks in one sitting temporarily raises your blood pressure, but repeated binge drinking can lead to long-term increases.” The organisation says heavy drinking is more than three drinks a day for women, four for men.

Blood pressure is defined as the force put on your blood vessels and organs as blood is pumped around your body by your heart.

Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers. The systolic pressure, higher number, is the force at which your heart pumps blood around your body.

The diastolic pressure, lower number, tylenol potentiate weed is the resistance to the blood flow in the blood vessels.

The NHS says: “Blood pressure readings between 120/80mmHg and 140/90mmHg could mean you’re at risk of developing high blood pressure if you do not take steps to keep your blood pressure under control.”

The Mayo Clinic adds: “Heavy drinkers who cut back to moderate drinking can lower their top number in a blood pressure reading (systolic pressure) by about 5.5 millimetres of mercury (mm Hg) and their bottom number (diastolic pressure) by about 4 mm Hg.”

Therefore, the organisation recommends if you have high blood pressure, avoid alcohol or drink alcohol only in moderation.

“For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women and up to two drinks a day for men,” it states.

The Mayo Clinic states: “Keep in mind that alcohol contains calories and may contribute to unwanted weight gain — a risk factor for high blood pressure.”

Moreover, alcohol can interact with certain blood pressure medications, affecting the level of the medication in your body or increasing side effects.

Indeed, Drinkaware says alcohol consumption “is an entirely preventable cause of severe hypertension” in both men and women.

It says the UK Chief Medical Officers’ (CMO) low risk drinking guidelines advise that people should not regularly drink more than more than 14 units a week to keep health risks from alcohol low.

“If you do choose to drink, it is best to spread your drinks throughout the week,” adds the organisation.

The NHS says that alongside reducing alcohol, high blood pressure can often be prevented or reduced by eating healthily, maintaining a healthy weight, taking regular exercise, and not smoking.

Indeed, cutting down on certain foods is one of the simplest ways to lower your blood pressure.

The NHS says: “A diet high in salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

“Some foods are almost always high in salt because of the way they are made.”

Blood Pressure UK explains: “Salt makes your body hold onto water. If you eat too much, the extra water in your blood means there is extra pressure on your blood vessel walls, raising your blood pressure.”

Physical activity can also help reduce your risk of heart and circulatory disease and reduce blood pressure and cholesterol.

High blood pressure often has no symptoms, and many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, according to the NHS.

As many as five million adults in the UK have undiagnosed high blood pressure, so will not know that they are at risk, according to the British Heart Foundation.

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