Boy, 12, makes £290,000 from coding online – could you? Youngster shares his top tip

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin are 'apolitical' says financial expert

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The London boy, who has never had a bank account, sold the artworks through the cryptocurrency Ethereum and is keeping all of his earnings in this form. He tokenised his artworks to create a digital ownership certificate which can be bought and sold online, despite never giving the buyer the actual artwork or copyright.

The cryptocurrency in which the artworks were sold through means it could increase or decrease in value and there would be no support from authorities if Benyamins’ account gets compromised.

Benyamin has a clear sense of digital money-making despite his age and advised his peers to do what they enjoy.

“My advice to other children that maybe want to get into this space is don’t force yourself to do coding, maybe because you get peer pressured – just as if you like cooking, do cooking, if you like dancing, do dances, just do it to the best of your ability,” he told the BBC.

He has a YouTube account which follows his coding hobby, alongside his other passions like swimming and taekwondo.

His incredible coding abilities were fostered by his father, Imran, who is a software developer in traditional finance and encouraged both of his sons to start coding at the ages of five and six respectively.

This assistance has proved vital as Benyamin’s father has assured that his son didn’t breach any copyright laws and has even involved his own lawyers to audit his sons’ work and advise on trademarks for his designs.

Having close family connections to technological experts has given the boys not just the ability to learn these valuable skills, but also have a plethora of people to get advice and help from.

Their father noted: “It was a little bit of a fun exercise – but I picked up on really early that they were really receptive to it and they were really good.

“So, then we started getting a little bit more serious – and now it’s every single day… but you can’t cram this stuff, you can’t say I’m going to learn coding in three months.

“The boys did 20 or 30 minutes of coding exercises a day – including on holiday,” he added.

Weird Whales is Benyamins’ second collection in the digital art world, following his Minecraft inspired pieces which didn’t quite receive the same attention as his whales.

Using pop-art digital style, and a program of his own creation, Benyamin created 3,350 whales inspired by the pixelated whale meme.

 

And he doesn’t plan to stop once the holidays are over, he is already planning his next collection to be superhero inspired.

He also added that a game featuring his whales “would be amazing”.

The overwhelming response to these small, digital whales has divided both the art world and NFT fanatics.

Artists have argued to say that NFTs are a vital line of additional revenue in the modern world of art, with many success stories like Benyamins’ keep raising high sales, although not many achieve this success quite so young.

However, there is a lot of cynical perspective arising from the investment side of NFTs.

Auctioneers and investors alike don’t believe the risk, and lacking physical evidence of anything actually having been bought, is worth their money.
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