Five warm weather habits that could see drivers fined up to £5,000 or even JAILED – here’s how to keep safe | The Sun

WITH another heatwave predicted for Britain, there are things that drivers must remember to avoid potential fines.

Those fines could total as much as £5,000, or in the most serious cases result in a jail sentence too. Below are the five main safety points to keep in mind.

Wearing impractical footwear at the wheel

Wearing flip flops is increasingly common as the weather gets warmer but it doesn't need to be said they aren't very useful when driving.

Rule 97 of The Highway Code clearly states that clothing and footwear should not prevent you from being able to use the controls.

If you are caught by the police or involved in an accident, you can be charged for “driving without due care and attention” – which carries a £100 on-the-spot fine and three penalty points on your licence. 

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You could potentially be hit by a maximum penalty of £5,000, nine points and potentially a driving ban.

It's recommended that motorists check their footwear before hitting the road or keep a spare pair of shoes in their car.

Drinking and driving

Summer time means day drinking and visiting pub gardens are popular activities.

However, it's important to remember that drinking and driving isn't right and we need to know when to stop drinking alcohol and start sobering up.

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Most people are aware that it’s illegal to drink any alcoholic beverage behind the wheel but 85,000 people are still convicted of drink driving related offences every year in England and Wales.

Driving a vehicle while under the influence can result in 3 months jail time, a fine of up to £2,500 and in some cases, a life-long driving ban. 

A drink-driving conviction could also mean that your car insurance will increase significantly.

Changing the music on a playlist

While using your phone when driving is commonly known as illegal, it's ok if you lean over to press skip on a song, right? Wrong.

This could land you in serious hot water as changing songs can be considered to be using your phone while driving.

Restrictions have been toughened up since last year and getting caught scrolling through songs could mean a £200 fine and six points on your license.

Leaving dogs in hot cars

With temperatures set to reach nearly 30 degrees next month, us humans tend to thrive but our furry friends can suffer.

The welfare of our pets should always be considered but there are multiple cases of dogs being abandoned in hot cars every summer which can lead to heatstroke and even death.

While leaving a dog alone in the car on a hot day is not illegal, motorists could be faced with an animal cruelty charge under the Animal Welfare Act which can carry an unlimited fine and even a six-month jail sentence.

Taking hay fever medication

With one in four people in the UK suffering from hay fever, it is common that people take antihistamines to prevent constant sneezing and streaming eyes.

However, this innocent medication could make you drowsy and impact your ability to drive.

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Driving under the influence of any drug, including any prescription or over-the-counter medications, is illegal if it impairs your abilities.

You could be slapped with a one-year driving ban and an unlimited fine, whilst the worst offences can carry a six-month jail sentence. 

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